Conference Keynote Summary

Library -2- LMS COCID Keynote
“Putting the Library in the Student’s Hands: Resources and Help through the Learning Management System”
Elizabeth J. Pyatt and Loanne Snavely, Penn State

At Penn State, “Putting the Library in the Students’ Hands” involves seamlessly linking existing resources through Angel using a Library Resources nugget that is native in all Angel courses. The exception to framed linking includes their home-grown Angel templates for creative native Angel research subject guides.

An impressive template system with drop-down menus that include all needed information for proxying students into library resources makes subject guide creation simple. Penn State’s cascading priority system assures that the most appropriate level guide available is displayed to the student. They have a cascading hierarchy of College, Department, Course, and Specific Course Section. Online tutorials are just a click away in the Angel guides.

Penn State’s success was built upon early participation in design with both library and IT. Angel Library resources have become very popular with professors and students, especially since students no longer have the excuse that they can’t find library resources. The development of resources hasn’t stagnated. Penn State’s Facebook application and use of Zotero are just the latest example of ways to push library resources into students’ hands.

Customer Service:It's the only thing that keeps you from being just another student in the library.

I think this just about says it all. The customer service training was a brief refresher of basic ideas that everyone knows. The rest of the time was used to ask the student assistants for info and opinions on the library. It was a neat chance to talk to them.

They also all appreciated the humor contained in the workshop. It's nice to know that my favorite-customer-service-library-video-clip-of-all-time (tm) still has a punch.



Nothing shows bad customer service like the librarian who gets frustrated when Cookie Monster asks for cookies.

I was also glad to be able to say that you can get both cookies _and_ milk in our library cafe. (Sometimes even the vending machines have cookies).

faux paus

Well... I inadvertently committed a facebook infraction today. Apparently I did not appropriately uncheck the boxes in 'friend finder' and it spammed lots of my friends. Thankfully one of them was good enough to point out my uncouth move. So I can feel much shame.

2 minutes in the sin bin.

Most sorry. That's what I get for trying to understand our undergrad students better.

Who, as I learned over the past two days, almost all use facebook. Something I had not taken up in my crusade to understand 2.0 type things. *sarcasm on* Go me for trying everything but the 1 thing they're all using. *sarcasm off*

In my defense, it's been a very long time since I've made a newbie move like that, so I'll move on now. =)

Dangers of Signage

Today our Interim Library Director stumbled upon this signage.

"Danger: DO NOT ENTER Library ->"

It has been an upward battle to get people into the library during the construction this summer.

At one point last week, even our main/only public entrance was taped off for construction. So people were routed through fire doors to the side.

Aquabrowser & Library Thing teaming up for tagging

Full details here: http://www.librarything.com/thingology/2007/08/librarything-and-aquabrowser-my.php

I'm excited about the possibilities. When Aquabrowser visited to show off their wares, I asked many questions about their plans for social tagging. What a nice surprise to see that they paired up with another favorite of mine, Library Thing!

Open ILS: Pines, the Evergreen Open-ILS Project, & the University of Rochester Extensible Catalog Project

This session has attracted a steady filter of people since 3:40. At 3:50 only a dozen seats remain and those will be quickly taken by the participants currently grabbing an XC handout from the back of the room.

5 of, SRO and floor space is getting filled with people sitting along the walls etc.

I've heard from Jennifer Bowen about the XC catalog before (UR has been very will to share their projects with other local libraries) and look forward to finding out about any new developments, as well as the opportunity to view the project in light of PINES and Evergreen. In light of the over capacity crowd, I feel just a little guilty to be taking up space to hear about XC again.

They expected this would be a really large room size for the program and the fire marshall wouldn't let them bring in more chairs.

John Rutherford, LITA open source interest group, Chris Strauber is the incoming chair.

Pines Project -
David Singleton

Software project debuted last September. Bill Erickson (sp?) and Jason Etheridge (sp?)are two developers in the room. Ask them the technical questions. ;)

Pines is a consortium 46 of the 56 library systems 256 facilities centralized linux structure 8.9 mil bib records and items as well as a 1.7 mil active card holder shared db.

1999 as a Y2K project since 26 systems (98 facilities) had Y2K compliant problems. Decided to work together as a group

Pines as a consortia, the library card is an actual library card available to anyone in Georgia, not just Pines libraries. Same card for every facility. Return materials to any facility. Can request materials from Union Cat delivered to your library from anywhere in the state for no charge. 5 day a week delivery to headquarters of systems. New books are protected for the first 6 months. Politically smart to keep your funding sources happy.

FY 2000 6000 loans. 480000 loans between library systems in GA today.

The power went out! -the lights cpme back on, the ppt is still running and we continue to go. -Fewer lights lit and the room is cooling down, yay!

Libraries agree to a common set of policies and procedures. User experience is common from library to library and fine structure. We lock the directors of the systems into a hotel and don't let them out until they agree. *grin*

When we came back to what was best for the patron experience it helped make the decisions. Fines stay at whatever library where the patron pays, except for payment for lost materials.
Outsourced overdue notices.

(This seems to be focused more on the politics and procedures of Pines rather than the technical how-to at this point. A little disappointing.)

User benefits, one interface, local library identity is maintained (results are first for the library you are at),
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This session has attracted a steady filter of people since 3:40. At 3:50 only a dozen seats remain and those will be quickly taken by the participants currently grabbing an XC handout from the back of the room.

5 of, SRO and floor space is getting filled with people sitting along the walls etc.

I've heard from Jennifer Bowen about the XC catalog before (UR has been very will to share their projects with other local libraries) and look forward to finding out about any new developments, as well as the opportunity to view the project in light of PINES and Evergreen. In light of the over capacity crowd, I feel just a little guilty to be taking up space to hear about XC again.

They expected this would be a really large room size for the program and the fire marshall wouldn't let them bring in more chairs.

John Rutherford, LITA open source interest group, Chris Strauber is the incoming chair.

Pines Project -
David Singleton

Software project debuted last September. Bill Erickson (sp?) and Jason Etheridge (sp?)are two developers in the room. Ask them the technical questions. ;)

Pines is a consortium 46 of the 56 library systems 256 facilities centralized linux structure 8.9 mil bib records and items as well as a 1.7 mil active card holder shared db.

1999 as a Y2K project since 26 systems (98 facilities) had Y2K compliant problems. Decided to work together as a group

Pines as a consortia, the library card is an actual library card available to anyone in Georgia, not just Pines libraries. Same card for every facility. Return materials to any facility. Can request materials from Union Cat delivered to your library from anywhere in the state for no charge. 5 day a week delivery to headquarters of systems. New books are protected for the first 6 months. Politically smart to keep your funding sources happy.

FY 2000 6000 loans. 480000 loans between library systems in GA today.

The power went out! -the lights cpme back on, the ppt is still running and we continue to go. -Fewer lights lit and the room is cooling down, yay!

Libraries agree to a common set of policies and procedures. User experience is common from library to library and fine structure. We lock the directors of the systems into a hotel and don't let them out until they agree. *grin*

When we came back to what was best for the patron experience it helped make the decisions. Fines stay at whatever library where the patron pays, except for payment for lost materials.
Outsourced overdue notices.

(This seems to be focused more on the politics and procedures of Pines rather than the technical how-to at this point. A little disappointing.)

User benefits, one interface, local library identity is maintained (results are first for the library you are at),
<power still not totally back, but the room seems cooler>
Patrons appreciate mobility and common policies.

Library benefits cost of automation is paid for them. Sharing of collections, has resulted in a change for many systems. A half or fulltime person just for loans. Lots of training in at least 4 locations so that no one has to travel more than 2 hours for training.

Legistlators love pines and get the cost savings.

Pines is 1.6 million to operate. Patron satisfaction comments -i have a library with more than 8 mil items in it. Cataloging coordinator said that the larger systems are benefiting too.

Evergreen -signed a 5 year contact that ended in June 2005 with a vendor. Looked around for rebid or another process. Brad was fresh out of library school and said one day I want to write an ILS.

Would you buy a car with the hood welded shut? Why buy an ILS like that? Thus -open source. Do you want to be a passenger shouting directions or the driver of the bus?

They were given a year to come up with something.

Is the software driving the policies??? The policies should inform the software. FOCUS GROUPS!

What did librarians want? (if they can pretend its magic)
Ease of use for customers
Enterprise class relational database
Scalability
Flexibility
Data security
Reports designed to correspond to annual reporting requirements

They used open source building blocks like a MARC editor

2004 began development migrated Sept. 2006
Went Live with online catalog, circ, catalog and reports. Migrated all the old data. The libraries all had to come up together.

FEATURES
ability to search popular commercial websites.
Googlelike spell checking and search suggestions
book covers reviews etc.
scalability
enhanced security
Customer empowerment to manage accounts RSS feeds
Streamlined online catalog that works with screen readers like Jaws (working on further refinements to work with mobile devices)
Virtual book bags of materials lists, updated RSS feeds (user generated bags)

Suveys provide flexivility
define autorizations by login
use of buckets to allow batch changes of things
simplified merging of bibliographic records

OPAC viewin the staff client. Use of tabs like Mozilla
ability to search any record in the patron record
truly randomized holds which work in a tiered structure. keeps the ratio of loans even
Postgresql
C++ Perl
Linux
Apache mod_perl
x86-64
Messaging platform is Jabber!

Costeffective, Reliable, Flexible (staff client works on windows mac linux)

Didn't previously use acq and serials... Hope to have it up in Beta in the fall.
Just decided on a partnership with XC

Have yet to complete a children's catalog, spanish translation, online bill pay for customers (accounting is the buggaboo) Galileo statewide information database provider. Working on the ability to perform a search in evergreen and click a button to re-execute the search in Galileo. Looking to do more social networking, tagging etc.

Worked closely with the university system and would like to work with universities to move beyond the PL scope.

http://www.gapines.org

open-ils.org is where you go to download the software see the developers blogs, comment on what you see etc....

10 minute pines demo...

single search box, deceptively simple

software will let you choose regular or larger font, can set it at a default.

Shelf Browser Feature lets you look to see what is on the shelf at that branch around a particular title!!!! Nice! smattering of clapping and a whistle.

Can see the marc if you want to. ;)

Advanced search lets you get specific about gormates types, genres, etc... audience if its in the marc record

Sorting, grouping formats and editions... (In case you have a book report tomorrow and don't care pb vs. hc etc)

My account feature, Bookbags, can share or not share and its RSS feed capable. Schools, book clubs etc...

----------

Extensible Catalog isnt an open ILS but a set of tools to work with an ILS open or otherwise. XC itself is Open source.

This wll sit alongside your ILS, it is not a replacement for your ILS. Very collaborative effort with lots of partners for the next stage of the project.

C4 prototype proof of concept demo may occur at the end.

(See handout sheets!)

Reveal library content on the web so it isn't hidden in the "deep web"

Provide access to library resources into other systems so that the user doesn't have to come to the library homepage or online offerings directly.

Course management, content managment, library webpage etc...

Locally customizable enduser interface... social networking is wrapped into it, but a library could integrate the content of XC into other systems intead of using XC as the launch pad.

Trasition between using your marc data and pulling it into an online environment (Dublin Core, etc).

UR anthropologist is a co-principle investigator and will be doing end user research at the same time as the development of the software.

Cornell and another library ? has applied for funding to bild the metadata services HUB

XC schema hoping to implement an RDA schema for Dublin Core for the basis of XCs schema

Drupal will build an out of the box user interface.

Also building a catalog and administrative drupal interface.

Blackboard is the next platform.
Sakai another platform.

Writing a generalizable code to be able to be massaged for other user platforms. php and java

Metadata generated through user interfaced could be metadata enrichment or user generated data, tagging reviews out of the drupal interface.

how to pull data out and "do cool things with it"

Phase 1 and 1 year grant is just finished to develop the project plan. Project plan was just submitted as part of a Phase II grant application to the Mellon Foundation. If funded start work in Octobert to actually build the system.

Build and deploy xc structure, user focus groups, develop governanace structre so that it remains viable for the future.

Rochester NY February snowed and cold partnership meeting.

Partner categories:
Implementation Partners -building a connection to each of the major ILSs
Advisory partners -institutions willing to share expertise or individual people etc....
Component partners -share developed software for development into XC (ie Cornell)
User research partners -Especially those that use various course management systems (((Does Brockport want to offer up Angel?)

Notre Dame -Aleph connector

Advisory Board
Andrew Pace (NCSU)
Karen calhousn OCLC
Barbara Tllet LOC
John Blyberg Darien Conn. Pub Lib

originally concieved as just academic, being opened up to all libraries. It's not just for academics anymore

Cornell Metadata Services
UB-staffing to work on blackboard connector
Others? Sakaai and Plone ontent Management Sstem

Yale, Cornell, Ohio State are user research partners

XC Vision!

www.extensiblecatalog.info

DEMO of c4 prototype
Indexed data in current catalog using Lucene. This isn't a really original thing. National Library of Australia has done this and put this in.
U Virginia blacklight project etc...

This isn't rocket science, 1 developer did the whole thing. This is where things are going....

google box look to start out. 2.4 mill records pulled out of voyager system. Trial with syndetics
facets on the left
looking at live lookup for circ stats and titles with highest circ status
No user or usability testing has occured on the prototype

metalib is integrated
just for fun were searching technorati too

live links back and forth to circulation
facets
format, region, genre etc...
the metadata that shows up is appropriate for the type of resource being viewed.

AJAX technology to use searches across the different tabs

have SFX but made software to totally avoid the SFX windows which was too confusing for users.

Tabs =Catalog, Metalib, Library website, Google, Blog
Kurt Vonnegut -nothing pornographic came up on technorati

Right now using Lucene and only Voyager is interfaced.


Questions
XC and world cat local?
-UR is trying to offer libraries something different to work on their own. At some point we'd love to work with OCLC to see what services they are offering and incorporate them both in XC. Put things in the hands of libraries

Evergreen -is it available to search articles/databases?
Not currently cross searching with journal articles. Hasn't been implemented yet.

Any other libraries on the planet using evergreen?
British Columbia, Vancouver they've mada a commitment to bring on several smaller libraries and will be brining on most academic public and school libraries within 5 years
U of Windsor has also made a commitment.

Holds randomized with a geographic component to save shipping costs?
Yes, possible.

Evergreen, use open book or previous open source efforts?
Did look at KOHA and several others, successes and limitations. Didn't like the scalability of Koha at the time. Learned from other systems and took pieces from there.

What Marc editor did you use?
There is a lot of software in libraries already that is open software. MARC 21 compliant.

XC still searching for active partners?
a little hesitant , need a SirsiDynix partner,
VTLS partner.... they do the development of the connector. UR does the support and make the stuff that the partner library works with XC. Can't get too many partners so that they don't have enough staff to work with them.

Pines -
Any issues with large and small systems and disparity in budgets... Found that the fears were unjustified. Smaller libraries saw it sooner and then the larger ones came online. Having discussions with metro systems in Atlanta. Nice balance between size of collection and number of items

Evergreen commitment to development? Many different levels. go to open-ils.org and give yoru input to participate on a simpler level.

Evergreen isn't working with a school library specifically at this time.

K-12 community to be developed?
Interest in that as part of Pines or as a standalone. 1200 school systems in Georgia, a big challenge.

PINES a project of the Georgia Public LIbrary Service

Will evergreen work with third party things? Self check, etc.
Yes it does. Cip2 compliant, self check RFID computer reservation systems etc. are currently working with it

Atlanta Fulton is not a PINES member?
6mo ago they established a pines exploratory committee to evalate the software and are in the decision making process.

Workflow in Pines, own ordering cataloging processing etc?
Systems do have their own workflows. With cataloging particularity if the record doesn't exist in pines, its brought in from OCLC or created and then brought in from OCLC, everyone attaches holdings to the same record and they are batch loaded into OCLC.

Florida state U The technology behind Evergreen?
out of time -developers will be available afterwards. Bill & Jason can talk to you about the techy sorts of things. (5 minutes)
Basic structure, how it works?

Gaming, Information Literacy, and the college student

This place is packed. 10 minutes in and I'm sitting down at the very back of the room on the floor. SRO spilling out into the hallway.

High-school/College students have a specialist language. Yu-Gi-Oh cards (several clauses). Popular culture engages for entertainment with highly specialized languages. But we can't teach em in school.

complex non-vernacular language, specialist language in the
Librarians play games. (good portion of the crowd are gamers, even more have kids who game).

Kids don't read manuals for the games. Written in a technical language, doesn't make you better at the game. Reading the book doesn't mean you can solve the problem.

gentle laughter throughout

After playing the game for several hours, then the "book means something"
Associating images, actions and dialog with everything in the game.

Thus biology textbooks mean nothing, they haven't played with that stuff. Play first, read next.

Technical language loses its nastiness when it has situational meanings.

People don't understand through abstraction and words out of context but through Images, actions, experience, dialog

Popular culture exposes kids to complicated thinking and language in ways that work.

Video games build into themselves learning principles. Since its long hard and complex (he had hair before he started a few years ago). People pay 50-60 dollars to play this long hard and demanding thing (they'd never pay that for algebra) so you'd better be able to learn the thing or they won't sell more games.
Video games are a problem solving space.

Learning Principles: (borrow for academics?)
Lower the consequences of failure. ---(Add more lives ;) If you don't explore and don't look everywhere, you miss lots of things (easter eggs). When you fail and look around, take the opportunity you get something good. Engage the Failure.

Play as inept. (How we learn our first language)! --- What a concept

Players are placed high on the agency tree. You have to make decisions

Games order problems well. -Don't pick problems that will lead them down a garden path. First problems should lead to fruitful hypothesis for the future. (Level Path)

Cycle, Challenge you can barely do, get a boss, rethink your mastery to prepare for challenge for a new level
Challenge Consolidation Challenge (a cycle by which anyone becomes a master at anything)

Stay within but at the outer edge of doable.

Games encourage players to think of systems and relationships.

---Wish I could see the ppt a little better... Refreshing to have a speaker who doesn't read off it

Games give verbal language to you just in time or on demand. (Not hours before you need it).

Leaning is embodied and affected by emotion. The emotional charge stores learning. If it matters to you, you learn it. Games make things matter.

Games recruit smart tools, distributed knowledge and functional teams. You don't have to have all the knowledge. Teams of swat members who know how to be swat teams. Partnership with character and player. Also multiplayer teams. Scientists have smart tools. WoW -video games take stuff that people think are a pain in the butt and make em fun. Cross-functional teams. priests, warriors, etc... with also generalized knowledge so that they can integrate seamlessly. High stress workplace as a form of entertainment.

Nobody learns anything unless you give them a new identity. Make them want to _be_ the carpenter, scientist etc. Identity is where the emotion comes from.

View of intelligence (baby boomer view, how fast and efficiently you move towards a goal). Games punish that view. Take your time, explore everything and rethink your goals.

The act of modifying the game, even as you play. Except many will let you edit levels, parts etc... Take AND Modify info.

Kids who modified the entire icelandic history.

Difference between games and simulation in science?? -Games are simulations that you are inside of. A surrogate body is in there. Scientists are not in there so much. Scientists however, think and talk as if they were in the simulation.

His argument: Games ultimately leads not to an attitude of how to do and use, but how to modify. "Modding Attitude

We should love to play games with children too. (end of author's talk)



-----------
Mr. George Neeland.

Apply rules that gamers have accepted to libraries.

Self-service, disaggregation -oclc environmental scan pattern recognition

Gamers are so highly wired and continuously connected they represent a sea change in culture.

Why is an old poop talking to us? -he does game. Not MMPOG. keyboard sounds on phone is games. English major, history minor. Love to see metaphors. Work cheaper than others.

John Joseph Duffy (Buffalo NY 1889) Grandpa. 31 when mass communications broke out. TV -hated milton berl 80 when people walked on the moon -shaped by the world he grew up in; assassinations, growth of technology, economic
1958 first video game. space war 1962 actual computer game, instructional computer game (how to use their computer)

Pong! (1975 SNL routine talking over pong game)
Nintendo founded in 1889 for hand painted playing cards. gameboy 1989
airwarrior first online airwarrior game for civilians. Genie service, $10/hr to play

How many gamers are there: no one really knows online vs. mmpg vs. at home yahoo backgammon, space marbles
75% of all statistics are made up on the spot -*smirk* -Speakers bible said he had to do this slide.

Nextgen, digital natives / immigrants, gamer generation -Names for those who grew up in the games

Doesn't matter the demographic spread or how many they are. !!! Today's students think and manage conflict in different ways than their predecessors, large amounts of data, ethical and moral decisions etc...!!!!

10 yo who has control over a world.. "With gaming you're involved and in control"

used to cell phone dial index finger =immigrant, thumbs = native, no cell = never left the old country.

I have an accent because I can remember an analog world?

Librarians have to help the digital immigrants become more comfortable in the digital environment.

Immigrants -more linear thinking
Natives -twitch, random access, text is less important than visuals, results oriented, fantasy

Master of Fine Arts =MBA


gamers are always the heros of their games - center of what they're doing
world is a logical human friendly place
move between tasks

-Life should be fun
-Multiple paths to victory and winning really is everything
-Failure along the way is not just an option it is to be expected
leaders cant be trusted
life should be fun

Compete, Collaborate (when the game is over), Create

games are built by the players who play them -how can we let people electronically write in the margins?

multiple paths to the good stuff- not a linear transaction.
many formats, platforms
Consider the non-print learner
Librarian as the information priest is as dead as Elvis, get over it!!!

(Transformation workshop quote) Comments from perceptions "Stop making it like church" altar of the reference desk with high priestess with missal of the terminal and if you are found worthy your question will be answered....

What can the user contribute rather than being a passive recipient?

RETHINK where we serve. games are ubiquitous. Home, streets, cars, phones etc... Information is ubiquitous we should be so to.

Online services are Journeys and Markers, not Destinations!!! Librarians like to search, patrons like to FIND

Privacy??? People have a different idea of what needs to be kept private. Gaming world and other social networking sites. 85% in the silly survey were willing to trade in their computer password for a $5 starbucks coupon

SHORTCUTS not training!! on time in demand learning when it is needed. "Let me show you a short cut, this will make it faster" vs. Let me teach you something.

We're a risk adverse profession. Gamers are not, ready, fire, aim!

Expertise through experience is more important than titles or credentials!

Games provide constant feedback, either you're playing the game or you're being knocked out. Status level bars. New generations of employees want CONSTANT feedback on what they're doing.

Try offering services we haven't in the past, more than just IM and text message services. Cues should come up as you need it. Throw a LAN party in your library. (Incredible success in Public libraries). Appeal to the people who might not think of the library as a place for a gamer.

Bring digital natives into your planning processes. Build for the current generation instead of the last one.

Old UB prof- Nothing in the library should be considered a loss-leader to bring people in.

Jenny Levine's book for TechSoruce is fabulous.

Grandson born in OH 1999 a member of college class 2017 or 2019. world trade center, film, phones always cell and touchtone google has always been a verb (age 3)

Nothing is built on stone, all is built on sand, but we must build as if sand was stone.

Gamers know there is no such thing as game over, reboot pick a new avatar and get over it.

Minding the COOP

Continuing in Operations Plans
1/3 of the room is occupied.

Maintaining and Improving Library Security Through Continuity of Operations

Federal Requirement for a COOP plan for federal agencies -could be embraced on a national level for all types of libraries

Steve Jones -Executive Dir. First Response Coalition. NAFFighters EMT/Firefighter (skiing accident)
Proposing Sept. 25th National First Responder Appreciation Day

Steve Hersh
Security Specialist at the LIbrary of Congress -AF Sec Policeman

Steve Jones, First Response Coalition:
Emergency Response Interoperability

First Response Coalition 501(c)3 non profit
Educate the public about first responder needs
Lobbying for public safety issues
Communication and access to data

Interoperability -Ability of first responders to be able to communicate as authorized, real time, across the board (Background)
Not able to communicate in previous incidents showed the problem. Incompatible equipment, frequencies etc...


5 challenges
1. Incompatible aging equipment (for that matter terminology police "10-code") --Just think about how hard it is to change cell providers and keep your phone.
2. Limited +/or fragmented funding and budget (Statewide systems may still buy in at different levels and affect interoperability)
3. Limited +/or or Fragmented planning and coordinator (Governance developed independently so you have patchwork systems.) --How like the SUNY systems many libraries, we're al doing different things but haven't had guidance to further interoperate. (
4. Limited +/or fragmented radio spectrum (frequencies -the schmutz in the sky that enables wireless comm. *smirk* Public Safety doesn't have a dedicated band of the spectrum. They started out in lower bands, have moved to higher frequencies as tech. has advanced. Public safety uses over 10 different bands. On top of increased demand and decreased supply. Interference with cell phones etc. can happen)
5. Limited standards
(Tech is advancing faster than standards and standards aren't moving fast enough to keep up.)


5 elements necessary for interoperability
Common Technology
Governance (Policy, People, Procedures)
SOPs (Formal written guidelines that dictate how ERS are going to communicate when they get together)
Training and Exercises (for the Ps about the SOPs and builds personal connections)
Using interoperable communications

GAO comments
Funding: No strategic plans to guide I/O investments. ($3-Billion since 2002 ineffectively spent)
Planning: No national plan to coordinate the responses across the states.

Standards -until recently, little progress. 15 years of work has resulted in incomplete and ambiguous standards. So more incompatibilities exist (p25 standard) costs more, so fewer radios are bought and interoperation problems persist.
FirstResponse Coalition.org
sjones@firstresponsecoalition.org

---------
Steve Hersh

LOC used some of this last night -chemical spill in photo lab

Business Continuity plan (COOP)
Prepares to maintain the business of the organization during a disaster
Also includes disaster recovery in the form of preservation curators cooperation and planning, they have good information to add to the process.
-what are the odds of disaster?
-to what extent do you want to continue functioning?

Disaster Recovery
Preservation Experts should be consulted for their unique perspective on this part of planning (Recover, contract negotiations etc.)
Traditional Disaster recovery dealt with IT continuity -moving forward

Understand and determine what your essential functions are
-Prioritize, Implement them in disaster from the top down following the list. Know that there will be diminished service

They have plans to continue to support congress from home, West Va. etc. (no. 1 function for LOC)

Do you have an alternate facility that can be occupied? (Not too close to the first one)
Determine order of succession at least three levels deep in your org. to include upper and mid-level management. (Pandemic (social problem) could wipe out 50% of your folks)
Can staff work from home, do they have the access (server?) that they need?
IT may have to relax security requirements to temporarily implement some of these functions. (Vulnerability exchange for operability)

Determine what resources and processes are necessary to implement essential functions
People, what percentage of staff would be available
Cross-training
Facilities -will relocation be needed
Equipment, available for common or unique jobs?
Food, brought in or local dining?
Lodging do staff go home or stay with local accommodations
Money for unknown circumstances and contracts

Consider resources outside the institution
-contractors could be spread thin too
Federal state and local offices may have plans that limit who can come in to work
Public utilities power, water, gas etc
Neighbor cultural institutions tend to partner for these sorts of plans depending on situation
Insurance carriers needs to know what you are doing get them a copy of the plan when you are done

Coordination of the plan
Need upper management support
Midlevel managers Contractors will determine if functions can be implemented
Contractors must sign on to support the institution in case of disaster
Local contacts for emergency responders, fire, police, etc.

Write the plan
Templates are available from FEMA and OPM.
Fluid plan that constantly changes and refreshes
Have al stakeholder review for consistency and inter-functionality
Good communications plan for Upper management, Middle management, Staff & Contract workers

Test the plan
draws out problems inconsistencies
Brings out personnel issues
Identifies resource shortages
Helps stake-holders to understand the process when enacted
Builds confidence in mangers and staff
-start slow talk about it at first, table top exercise, let key players respond to alternative work sites and conduct communications check. Have the entire staff go through a communications notification test

Maintain the plan,
make changes based on testing data
stay up to date with new technical info and apply to the plan as needed
review the plan annually, what if your "business model" has changed?
distribute to all the key players so they have the changes

Appealing to your target audience...

We just had a great meeting with the Rochester Ad Council who is doing a communications audit of our library. Within the discussion we had to decided what was more important, increasing usability of the library or increasing usage. As a whole it was felt that the usability of the library would trump usage when it comes to prioritizing.

With freshmen established as our first priority 'audience' or 'target segment' when it comes to communications. As you are well aware, communication is invasive in our lives and libraries. Everything from signs, to press releases fall under that category.

Our Archives Librarian noted the tendency of librarians to use library-ese or library jargon on their websites. My brain started to click. If I go MIA, the following thought would be responsible:

What if we were to re-label the reference desk with a sign that says "Library Wizard"?

The thought germinated as I ruminated on the Apple Genius Bar concept. I tossed it around trying to come up with an alternative that would mean something to our incoming students. The old concept of the IT wizard seemed relevant. With Harry Potter as such a touchstone, and Wizards commonly known as ways to make doing stuff easier, it seems like such a fit. It would also work well with combined library/it desks if labeled "Information Wizard" or something to that effect.

I'd love some feedback on this idea.